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Civilian Casualties


A father grieves over his dead child
Despite the claims of great care and "smart bombs" by the US military, there have been many civilian casualties in the war against Afghanistan, more in fact than the total number people killed in the September 11 attacks.

Because civilian casualty reports have been largely downplayed and sometimes suppressed in the mainstream western media, we have attempted to compile an accurate account of the actual casualties here.

Date Event Summary
24 October 2001 US bombs struck a mosque United Nations reported US bombs struck a mosque in a military compound and a nearby village during raids on the western Afghan city of Herat
24 October 2001 US is dropping cluster bombs US is dropping cluster bombs, antipersonnel weapons that disperse small bomblets over a wide area. Bomblets that do not explode turn into landmines, ready to detonate on contact. (Guardian UK, BBC)
23 October 2001 US bombers killed 22 Pakistani fighterss US bombers killed 22 Pakistani fighterss from a hard-line Muslim paramilitary group (Harkat-ul-Mujahidin) in Kabul in the deadliest strike yet. (BBC) Another report that 34 Pakistanis killed in the US bombing on Kabul and 6 bodies will reach Karachi on Oct. 24. (Dawn, Pakistan)
22 October 2001 93 civilians were killed in strike near Kandahar Al-Jazeera reported that 93 civilians were killed in strike near Kandahar (village of Chukar) including 18 members of one family. 40 others were wounded. (Guardian UK)
22 October 2001 us bombs hit the remote Afghan village of Thori l Human Rights Watch reports that us bombs hit the remote Afghan village of Thori located near a Taliban military base in the Oruzgan province (near the central highlands) killing 23 civilians. (Human Rights Watch said at least 25 and possibly 35 Afghan civilians died when us bombs hit Chowkar-Karez (a village 40 km north of Kandahar) on the night of October 22. Six wounded are currently recovering in Quetta hospitals including 5 year old Shabir Ahmed with severe shrapnel wounds to his head. The bombing started at 11 pm. Aircraft returned later to fire from guns, said witnesses. Villagers insisted that there were no Taliban or Al-Qaida targets in the area. (Human Rights Watch)
22 October 2001 more than 40 people were killed in raids near Kabul and in Herat Taliban spokesman said that more than 40 people were killed in raids near Kabul and in Herat on Monday night. (BBC)
21 October 2001 stray United States bomb hit a UN (or military) hospital A stray United States bomb hit a UN (or military) hospital in Herat, in the west, reportedly killing 100 people. (Times London) Rumsfeld said he had seen "absolutely no evidence" that American bombs or missiles had hit a hospital or killed 100 people. Later that night, one Pentagon official said it appeared that an American missile had gone astray near Herat, and might have struck a nonmilitary target, which might have been a hospital. (New York Times Oct. 23)
21 October 2001 15 people were killed US jets struck before dawn today near the southern city of Kandahar, and officials there claimed that 15 people were killed when a bomb exploded at a hospital. (Guardian UK)
20 October 2001 US Navy F-14 inadvertently dropped two 500-pound bombs US Navy F-14 inadvertently dropped two 500-pound bombs on a residential area northwest of Kabul, US officials said. The fighter had been aiming at military vehicles parked about half a mile away. (Los Angeles Times Oct. 24)
19 October 2001 80% of Kandahar residents had left the city 80% of Kandahar residents had left the city to escape the bombing. (Geov Parrish, Radio Station WRL, Seattle)
Records 21 to 30 of 39

The Alliance for a Secular and Democratic South Asia was formed in 1993 to combat rising religious intolerance in South Asia and to campaign for peace and justice in the region. We are committed to working towards a just, non-violent resolution of the crisis we are currently living through. If you are interested in joining us in this work, please call 617-983-3934 or e-mail info@alliancesouthasia.org

7 Feb 2007

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